Archive by Author

New GEOMETRY Product on Horizon

New Geometry product on horizon from Singing Turtle Press. Math author Josh Rappaport is coming out with an eBook on geometry. Read this post to find out more!

The “Ladder of Primes”

Prime numbers help us reduce fractions Using the “Ladder of Primes,” students can more easily and more quickly reduce fractions to lowest terms.

Summertime Geometry Scavenger Hunt

Math is everywhere, when you start looking for it. In this post you learn about a fun summertime geometry project. Have your children look at highway signs and try to find as many geometric objects as they can. They can even come up with geometry problems based on the signs, too.

Monday the 13th

If Friday the 13th is a bad luck day, does that imply that Monday the 13th is a good luck day? Compose a logical argument for this question. Whoever sends in the best logical argument, arguing either side of this question, wins a Singing Turtle reward. Read the post to find out the details.

Find the LCM in a way that makes sense! (Part 1)

For the most part, when you set out to find the least common multiple for a pair of numbers, you are asked to go through a bunch of steps that don’t really make sense. Till now! Here’s a way to find the LCM that truly does make sense. This post explains it in clear English, and it throws in some nice tables and diagrams to make the whole process make even more sense!

Short Break

Hello everyone, During this transition between the end of the school year and the start of summer, I will be taking a break from blogging. The break will be either one week or two weeks … I’m not quite sure yet. In any case I will be back in touch in the early-to-mid part of [...]

James Bond Math Challenge

Take this informal quiz. Watch this clip from a James Bond movie, and see what math themes and patterns you can find in the art and visuals. Then drop me a comment. I’ll share all comments that make reasonable statements.

Quick Easy Way to Untangle Confusion re: “Greater” and “Less”

Once students learn about negative numbers and absolute value, the concept of greater and less becomes a bit “cloudy.” What was once clear is now “muddied.” But there is an easy way for students to tell which of two numbers is greater and which is less. That method involves looking at the numbers on the number line and using a memory trick derived from the spelling of the words “greater” and “less.” Enjoy!